Deal May Ease Online House Hunting The Justice Department and the National Association of Realtors reached a tentative agreement Tuesday in a case involving the Multiple Listing Service. This means online realtors will have better access to information about homes for sale. Internet-based agents had been denied access to the MLS databases.
NPR logo

Deal May Ease Online House Hunting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90880191/90880167" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Deal May Ease Online House Hunting

Law

Deal May Ease Online House Hunting

Deal May Ease Online House Hunting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90880191/90880167" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Justice Department and the National Association of Realtors reached a tentative agreement Tuesday in a case involving the Multiple Listing Service. This means online realtors will have better access to information about homes for sale. Internet-based agents had been denied access to the MLS databases.

ROBERT SMITH, Host:

NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports.

YUKI NOGUCHI: The Multiple Listing Service - or MLS - is a critical tool for realtors. It's a database that contains almost all home listings in any market, so traditional realtors worried about allowing it to get into the hands of online rivals.

MICHAEL DAVIN: Anybody can see when consumers gain access to market data they don't need as much handholding when they buy a house as they would otherwise. Same thing if I'm buying a television set. I can do a lot of my research online, so when I go into the store I'm ready to buy.

NOGUCHI: Yuki Noguchi, NPR News, Washington.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.