India's Army Takes New Position on Yoga India's army conducted a three-month study in which soldiers did more yoga poses than traditional exercise. The idea was that the stress-relieving practice could be a way to train deadlier fighters. Researchers found that fighters had steadier hands and stronger grips than peers who stuck to standard physical training.
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India's Army Takes New Position on Yoga

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India's Army Takes New Position on Yoga

India's Army Takes New Position on Yoga

India's Army Takes New Position on Yoga

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91143066/91143161" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

India's army conducted a three-month study in which soldiers did more yoga poses than traditional exercise. The idea was that the stress-relieving practice could be a way to train deadlier fighters. Researchers found that fighters had steadier hands and stronger grips than peers who stuck to standard physical training.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

India's army is taking a new position on yoga. The idea? The stress-relieving practice could be a way to train deadlier fighters. The army conducted a study where soldiers did more yoga poses than traditional exercise. Researchers found that fighters had steadier hands and stronger grips than peers who stuck to standard physical training. Now this peaceful tradition could become the newest weapon of war.

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