Long Island Teens Give Up Cars in Gas Protest A class discussion on civil disobedience inspired a group of seniors at a Long Island high school to organize a protest against high gas prices. Despite heavy rain, hundreds of students left their cars at home and walked, scooted or biked to school.
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Long Island Teens Give Up Cars in Gas Protest

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Long Island Teens Give Up Cars in Gas Protest

Long Island Teens Give Up Cars in Gas Protest

Long Island Teens Give Up Cars in Gas Protest

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A class discussion on civil disobedience inspired a group of seniors at a Long Island high school to organize a protest against high gas prices. Despite heavy rain, hundreds of students left their cars at home and walked, scooted or biked to school.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Our last Word in business is about high gas prices fuelling a new wave of student protests - at least at one high school in Long Island, New York. The word is scooters, skateboards and bicycles. It seems that a class discussion on civil disobedience inspired a group of seniors to organize a protest against high gas prices. So yesterday, despite a steady downfall of rain, hundreds of students left their car keys at home. They walked, scooted and biked to school. Some teachers carpooled in a hybrid.

Student anger seemed to focus on gas companies like Exxon Mobil and the profits they're reaping in this era of high oil prices. The question, of course, is what the students will do tomorrow. Will they continue their rebellious commute or will they ditch the skateboards and rev up their engines again?

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