Top of the News The latest headlines.
NPR logo

Top of the News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91233124/91232151" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Top of the News

Top of the News

Top of the News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91233124/91232151" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The latest headlines.

BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

(Soundbite of music)

MARK GARRISON: Thanks, Mike. Ex-rivals Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton met last night to talk about the future. NPR's Scott Horsley has more.

SCOTT HORSLEY: Barack Obama had been scheduled to fly home to Chicago Thursday night. Instead, he and Hillary Clinton huddled for a private meeting. The joint statement afterward said they had a productive discussion about the important work ahead for the Democratic Party. Obama, who clinched his party's nomination this week, says he'll be reaching out to Clinton's supporters.

(Soundbite of press conference)

Senator BARACK OBAMA (Democrat, Illinois): She ran a magnificent campaign. She inspired millions of people. She inspired the best from me. And we are going to be working together to win in November.

HORSLEY: In an email message to supporters, Clinton said she plans to announce her formal support for Obama tomorrow.

GARRISON: NPR's Scott Horsley reporting. New York Senator Charles Schumer is a big Clinton supporter. He said this morning the meeting was not about the vice presidency. But he did add Clinton would take the VP slot if offered, and if not, she'll work just as hard campaigning for Obama if someone else gets the job.

Wildfires are tearing through western Texas. At least 35,000 acres have burned. High winds have fanned the flames, but firefighters expect lower winds today, which will make their job easier. They had more than half of it contained as of last night.

Firefighters like a good, hard rain, but in Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota and Minnesota, they're getting rain and a lot more, and they're ready for a break. Frank Morris of member station KCUR has the story of the nasty storms there.

FRANK MORRIS: Tornados fired across much of the region, ripping up buildings, power lines and farm equipment. Interstate 29 in northern Missouri is closed after a twister toppled semi trucks. Hurricane-force straight-line winds battered parts of Kansas and Oklahoma. Heavy rains sparked flash floods and drove the Missouri River and smaller streams over their banks. A tornado near tiny WaKeeney, Kansas, spooked two elephants in town with a traveling circus. The beasts stampeded through the broad streets there until trainers subdued them.

GARRISON: Frank Morris of member station KCUR reporting. A couple of light earthquakes rocked the Bay Area this morning. They struck about 19 miles east of downtown San Francisco. Early reports measured them at 3.0 and 3.5 magnitude. No major damage or injuries.

A plan for a nationwide free Wi-Fi is stalled in Washington. The Federal Communications Commission will not vote on the proposal this month. The U.S. has dropped to 30th in the world in the percentage of homes with broadband access. It was 15th just seven years ago.

(Soundbite of basketball game)

(Soundbite of cheering)

Unidentified Announcer: And the Celtics win!

GARRISON: Celtics fans had plenty to cheer about last night. Boston beat the LA Lakers 98 to 88 in game one of the NBA Finals. Game two is in Boston on Sunday night. That's your news, sports, even a little elephant coverage. It's all online all the time at npr.org.

WOLFF: This is NPR.

MIKE PESCA, host:

A little elephant coverage goes a long way.

GARRISON: Never hurts.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.