Letters: Food Prices Robert Siegel reads from listeners' e-mails about rising food prices and the effect it has on shoppers.
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Letters: Food Prices

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Letters: Food Prices

Letters: Food Prices

Letters: Food Prices

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Robert Siegel reads from listeners' e-mails about rising food prices and the effect it has on shoppers.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

And now it's time to get some of your feedback on our show. Many of you wrote to us about our story yesterday on the impact of rising food prices. NPR's Alix Spiegel went shopping with three very different women - one woman who has been having trouble making ends meet, another woman who's been forced to cut corners, and yet another who has stopped shopping at the organic grocery Whole Foods. Well, you can guess which of the three got listeners riled up.

Ms. DIANE KRAUSE (Shopper): And I started looking at the prices and what I was buying. And I realized I had $140 worth of food in the cart and I didn't have three meals. And I realized I could not afford to shop there.

SIEGEL: If you chose the former Whole Foods shopper, you guessed right.

Having only heard the last third of your report, I was somewhat relieved to find out later that the first two-thirds discussed people who are actually struggling to put food on the table.

This is from Dan Abbott of Norfolk, Virginia. Mr. Abbot continues: Still, the relevance of discussing an upper middle class person's dilemma of having to downgrade from the organics of Whole Foods to a more reasonable grocery store escapes me.

Many of you wrote to point out that eating organic doesn't have to be a budget buster. I make about $150 less than the poorest of the people profiled, writes Olivia Powell of North Little Rock, Arkansas, yet I manage to buy incredibly healthy food, mostly organic, without overspending my budget. How? My yard is small, but it's packed with produce that I grow.

And Larry Gates of Morristown(ph), Virginia, adds: I hope that most of your listeners will recognize that they can still help their families and our planet by eating organic without spending a fortune - admittedly with a little effort and attention and maybe, gasp, some home cooking.

We're always interested in knowing what you think. If you want to write to us, go to npr.org and then click where it says Contact Us. And when you get there, please don't forget to let us know where you live and how you pronounce your name.

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