Elizabeth Edwards, Facing the Future Elizabeth Edwards says the return of her breast cancer won't interrupt her husband's bid for the White House — and that she will work on his campaign. The announcement resonated with many people.

Elizabeth Edwards, Facing the Future

Elizabeth Edwards, Facing the Future

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Elizabeth Edwards says the return of her breast cancer won't interrupt her husband's bid for the White House — and that she will work on his campaign. The announcement resonated with many people.

Blog: My Cancer

A journalist for more than 25 years, Leroy Sievers has worked at CBS News and ABC News, where he was the executive producer at Nightline. You can follow his story and share your own at his daily blog.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And as she spoke last night on "60 Minutes," Elizabeth Edwards said that was a message she hoped people would hear.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW "60 MINUTES")

ELIZABETH EDWARDS: We're all going to die, and I pretty much know what I'm going to die of now. But I do want to live as full and normal a life as I can from this point on.

INSKEEP: We asked our commentator Leroy Sievers, who checks in with us regularly about his own life as a cancer patient, for his thoughts.

LEROY SIEVERS: And though cancer patients are brave, though we fight like hell, we're honest with ourselves too. We know the one thing we want just isn't possible. We want someone to fix it, to make it go away. Along with everything else, cancer robs us of our innocence.

INSKEEP: Leroy Sievers sends us a blog and podcasts about his experiences with cancer. And you can find them on our Web site. To follow his story and share your own, go to npr.org/MyCancer.

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