1878 Phone Book Up for Auction. That Is All Somebody might pay tens of thousands of dollars at this week's auction of an 1878 phone book from New Haven, Conn. Recipients of the directory got the following instructions on how to use the phone: Begin calls by saying, "Hulloa!" Keep conversations to three minutes. Report anyone using profanity. And end the conversation by declaring, "That is All."
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1878 Phone Book Up for Auction. That Is All

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1878 Phone Book Up for Auction. That Is All

1878 Phone Book Up for Auction. That Is All

1878 Phone Book Up for Auction. That Is All

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91544442/91544568" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Somebody might pay tens of thousands of dollars at this week's auction of an 1878 phone book from New Haven, Conn. Recipients of the directory got the following instructions on how to use the phone: Begin calls by saying, "Hulloa!" Keep conversations to three minutes. Report anyone using profanity. And end the conversation by declaring, "That is All."

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. Somebody might pay tens of thousands of dollars at this week's auction of a phone book. It's the 1878 directory from New Haven, Connecticut. Recipients got the numbers of all 50 subscribers. They also got the following instructions on how to use the phone: Begin calls by saying Hulloa! Keep conversations to three minutes - right - report anyone using profanity, and end the conversation by declaring, that is all.

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