Lipbone Redding: 'Dogs of Santiago' Lipbone Redding has made a career of vocalizing the sounds of keys, drums, bass lines and horns. The "trombone" on Hop the Fence, his latest release, is actually his voice.
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Lipbone Redding: 'Dogs of Santiago'

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Lipbone Redding: 'Dogs of Santiago'

Lipbone Redding: 'Dogs of Santiago'

Lipbone Redding: 'Dogs of Santiago'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9172530/9172547" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

'Fonky-tonkin' mouth' musician Lipbone Redding. hide caption

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'Fonky-tonkin' mouth' musician Lipbone Redding.

Lipbone Redding has made a career of vocalizing the sounds of keys, drums, bass lines and horns. The "trombone" on Hop the Fence, his latest release, is actually his voice. Redding's music takes certain musical and vocal cues from Tom Waits, Curtis Mayfield and New Orleans bluesman Dr. John.

Redding grew up in rural North Carolina, but has traveled and performed throughout the world. He currently resides in New York City.

He' a self-described "human beat box" of jazz, blues, jam and soul music. "Make that a human sweet box," he said.

Redding aims to surpass what could be seen as a gimmick of just vocalization stunts. He considers himself a full-fledged music artist and wants to "bring the love."