Internet Helps Liberate, Create Music in China For many Chinese, the Web isn't merely a tool to help circumvent political censorship. Some Chinese musicians are exploiting online tools and sites to create new economic models for the music business.
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Internet Helps Liberate, Create Music in China

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Internet Helps Liberate, Create Music in China

Internet Helps Liberate, Create Music in China

Internet Helps Liberate, Create Music in China

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91839214/91868792" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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B6 works out of a home studio in a Shanghai high-rise. Above, some of his musical arsenal. hide caption

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B6 works out of a home studio in a Shanghai high-rise. Above, some of his musical arsenal.

Discover China's Indie Music

With Sean Leow, B6 co-founded the music-sharing site Neocha.com, an ad-supported service that lets listeners discover music and pays musicians a share of advertising revenue. Neocha.com hide caption

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Neocha.com

Hear a B6 Song

'My Post-Rock Yard'

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B6, a Shanghai-based electronic musician, explored Western music first on pirated CDs and then at music-sharing sites on the Web. Now he collaborates online with other performers. hide caption

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