Environmental Educator Eyes Yosemite Roadkill Moose Mutlow, a quirky environmental education instructor in Yosemite National Park, has been tracking the roadkill there to figure out what gets killed and why. He's armed with a clipboard, a baseball bat to kill suffering animals who don't seem likely to survive encounters with cars, and a shovel to pry flattened victims from the blacktop. For one study, he spent nearly a year surveying 30 miles of highway twice daily, and found endangered great gray owls and bears. He's worked with park rangers to create "Red Bear, Dead Bear" signs for park visitors to urge them to slow down. From KQED, Sasha Khohka reports.
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Environmental Educator Eyes Yosemite Roadkill

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Environmental Educator Eyes Yosemite Roadkill

Environmental Educator Eyes Yosemite Roadkill

Environmental Educator Eyes Yosemite Roadkill

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Moose Mutlow, a quirky environmental education instructor in Yosemite National Park, has been tracking the roadkill there to figure out what gets killed and why.

He's armed with a clipboard, a baseball bat to kill suffering animals who don't seem likely to survive encounters with cars, and a shovel to pry flattened victims from the blacktop.

For one study, he spent nearly a year surveying 30 miles of highway twice daily, and found endangered great gray owls and bears. He's worked with park rangers to create "Red Bear, Dead Bear" signs for park visitors to urge them to slow down.

Sasha Khohka reports from KQED.