Looking Back on Jesse Helms' Life "Sen. No," as he was often called, "was a real throwback," says Merle Black, a professor of southern politics at Emory University. One of a select group of politicians who helped solidify Republican control in the South, he had a loyal constituency of working-class whites in North Carolina.
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Looking Back on Jesse Helms' Life

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Looking Back on Jesse Helms' Life

Looking Back on Jesse Helms' Life

Looking Back on Jesse Helms' Life

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Sen. No, as he was often called, died Friday at the age of 86. Jesse Helms "was a real throwback," says Merle Black, a professor of southern politics at Emory University. One of a select group of politicians who helped solidify Republican control in the South, he had a loyal constituency of working-class whites in North Carolina. Black explores Helms' political gifts and weaknesses with Robert Siegel.