The Buzz: Rock The Net, Annoy Your Cat From YouTube to MySpace to Friendster, young people — and some not-so-young people — are making news that's popping up on the Web only. Andrea Seabrook runs down the latest stories blazing across the viral world of the Web.
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The Buzz: Rock The Net, Annoy Your Cat

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The Buzz: Rock The Net, Annoy Your Cat

The Buzz: Rock The Net, Annoy Your Cat

The Buzz: Rock The Net, Annoy Your Cat

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92259348/92259324" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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From YouTube to MySpace to Friendster, young people — and some not-so-young people — are making news that's popping up on the Web only. Andrea Seabrook runs down the latest stories blazing across the viral world of the Web.

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ANDREA SEABROOK, host:

We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Andrea Seabrook.

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SEABROOK: Want to be the hippest chick at the party tonight, the raddest dad at playgroup? Well, here's a newscast of a different sort, a few things blazing across the viral world of the Internet.

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Unidentified Woman: Like copper with no relation to the girls are all around with, a lunar modulation…

SEABROOK: This is the Canadian band, the Classic Brown. It's mostly the work of indie artist Stacey Brown. This track called "Modulation" is part of a new campaign called Rock the Net. It's musicians of all genres and styles banding together to support what is known as Net neutrality - that's the principle that the Internet should be free and open with no paid sections or preferred users.

The "Rock the Net" CD includes new tracks from Wilco, They Might Be Giants, REM and…

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Unidentified Woman #2: (Singing) (unintelligible)

SEABROOK: …DJ Spooky. The CD is set for release on July 29.

The obsession of the techno blogs this week, Thursday's federal court ruling forcing Google to hand over a database full of usernames and addresses of every computer that's ever been used to watch a video on YouTube. Yes, even you who watched videos of cats all afternoon.

Viacom requested the data as part of its copyright infringement case against Google, the owner of YouTube. Viacom owns Paramount Pictures and MTV, among other networks. It claims YouTube's popularity has been fueled by illegally copied content and that YouTube hasn't done enough to police users and take down illegal copies.

Privacy advocates say the ruling could reveal personal information of millions of private citizens. It will take weeks for Google to turn over all that information - it's five terabytes worth. That's enough data to fill two full academic research libraries. Who's going to read all of that?

And speaking of the wild popularity of cats online, if you didn't know it, it's true, one of the top videos on YouTube this week shows a guy who calls himself Corey Mister Safety, offering you practical advice on how to annoy your kitty.

COREY MISTER SAFETY (YouTube Contributor): First thing you're going to need is a receipt. Just about any type of receipt works. And what you want to do is rub it on your head and if it sticks to your hair then it's the perfect type of receipt to use for this.

So, what you do is you grab the kitty and you rub it on his back, make him feel good and you let it go, and the cat is going to have a receipt stuck to its back and won't know what to do. Try to leave on the top of the back and just watch him go crazy.

SEABROOK: This video, believe it or not, has been viewed close to half a million times this week. Dozens and dozens of people have posted their own videos, sticking receipts to their cats, with varied success.

Ah, the Internet, so important and so inane.

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