Awful Flight Inspires Novel: 'Dear American Airlines' Jonathan Miles wrote Dear American Airlines after surviving a bad trip from Memphis to New York. He ended up sleeping under a table in Peoria, Ill. The main character of the novel gets stuck trying to travel across country for a wedding.
NPR logo

Awful Flight Inspires Novel: 'Dear American Airlines'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92278850/92278822" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Awful Flight Inspires Novel: 'Dear American Airlines'

Awful Flight Inspires Novel: 'Dear American Airlines'

Awful Flight Inspires Novel: 'Dear American Airlines'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92278850/92278822" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jonathan Miles wrote Dear American Airlines after surviving a bad trip from Memphis to New York. He ended up sleeping under a table in Peoria, Ill. The main character of the novel gets stuck trying to travel across country for a wedding.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Today's last word in business comes from airline passenger Jonathan Miles. The word is "Dear American Airlines," the title of a book Miles wrote after surviving a trip from Memphis to New York. He ended up sleeping under a table in Peoria. Mr. Miles' book is a novel, and the main character gets stuck trying to travel across country for a wedding. "Dear American Airlines" is selling well, though we do not know if the author is earning enough money to pay the extra charges for his luggage during the book tour.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.