Letters: War Protests, Airport Announcer in Brazil Letters this week include comments on recent stories about the Monacan Indian Nation, war protests in Washington, D.C., an airport announcer in Brazil and a leprechaun ban on St. Patrick's Day.
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Letters: War Protests, Airport Announcer in Brazil

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Letters: War Protests, Airport Announcer in Brazil

Letters: War Protests, Airport Announcer in Brazil

Letters: War Protests, Airport Announcer in Brazil

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9264818/9264819" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Letters this week include comments on recent stories about the Monacan Indian Nation, war protests in Washington, D.C., an airport announcer in Brazil and a leprechaun ban on St. Patrick's Day.

DEBBIE ELLIOTT, host:

It's been a few weeks since we've read your comments on the air. So we turn the next few moments over to our listeners.

Kida Sullivan(ph) of Roxbury, Massachusetts told us she listened to our story on the Monacan Indian Nation with tears in her eyes. Ms. Sullivan identifies herself as part of them on Montauket Nation of New York State. She said the story of the Monacans is the same story that I and my family have been living with, a state that enforces unfair laws, swindles tribes out of their lands, and then reclassifies its people so that they can be said to no longer exist.

Many listeners weighed in after our coverage of this month's protests in Washington, one against the Iraq war and the other against the anti-war protesters. Several, like Dorothy Tudor(ph) of Colombia, South Carolina, took issue when our reporter described the counter-demonstrators as being pro-troops. Ms. Tudor writes that it was the anti-war crowd that was, in fact, very supportive of the troops. They want to get the troops out of the middle of civil war, she says.

Julie McCarthy amused us all with the story about the world's most seductive airport announcer, Iris Lettieri.

(Soundbite of airport P.A. system)

ELLIOTT: Julie reported that many male travelers are titillated by Ms. Lettieri's voice. Thomas Cantwell(ph) of Bristow, Virginia would not be among them. He writes: I hate to disabuse the Rio de Janeiro announcer, but it is all too obvious that she has been a heavy smoker for years.

And finally, listener Renee Dodge(ph) sent us this after we reported that New York had banned leprechauns from its St. Patrick's Day Parade. She wrote: I would like to extend an invitation to all those rejected for wearing costumes. Come on down to New Orleans next year. We'd be delighted to have you.

And we'd be delighted to hear your comments. Go to our Web site, npr.org. Click on Contact Us and select WEEKEND ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. And please, tell us how to pronounce your name.

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