U.S. Civilians Recruited To Help Troubled Nations The State Department hopes patriotism will compel American civilians to leave their comfortable lives in the U.S. for far-flung locales and potentially dangerous work: saving states the U.S. classifies as "failing." Critics say the program will be seen as nation building.
NPR logo U.S. Civilians Recruited To Help Troubled Nations

U.S. Civilians Recruited To Help Troubled Nations

At a ceremony at the State Department on July 16, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice formally launched the interagency Civilian Response Corps. State Department hide caption

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Eythan Sontag, an officer with the State Department's Active Response Corps, in Darfur. He was sent to help the government implement a peace agreement with the region's leading rebel group. State Department hide caption

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Eythan Sontag, an officer with the State Department's Active Response Corps, in Darfur. He was sent to help the government implement a peace agreement with the region's leading rebel group.

State Department

The Sudanese government has long been unable to achieve peace in the Darfur region. Sontag was sent to aid in the stabilization process. State Department hide caption

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The Sudanese government has long been unable to achieve peace in the Darfur region. Sontag was sent to aid in the stabilization process.

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In Jebel Moon, Sontag meets with rebels from the Justice and Equality Movement. State Department hide caption

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In Jebel Moon, Sontag meets with rebels from the Justice and Equality Movement.

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