U.S., South Korea Agree on Trade Deal U.S. and South Korean negotiators endorse a plan to expand business between the two countries by up to 20 percent. They already do more than $70 billion in trade a year. Lawmakers in both nations must sign off on the deal.
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U.S., South Korea Agree on Trade Deal

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U.S., South Korea Agree on Trade Deal

U.S., South Korea Agree on Trade Deal

U.S., South Korea Agree on Trade Deal

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U.S. and South Korean negotiators endorse a plan to expand business between the two countries by up to 20 percent. They already do more than $70 billion in trade a year. Lawmakers in both nations must sign off on the deal.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with a trade deal covering cars and beef.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: And incidentally, a lot more. The U.S. may be entering into its biggest international trade deal since NAFDA. Today, American and South Korean negotiators announced a sweeping plan that they say could increase business between the two countries by as much as 20 percent. The U.S. and South Korea already do more than $70 billion in trade per year. Now in order for this deal to become reality, lawmakers in both countries, including skeptical Democrats in Congress, must first sign off on the deal.

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