Letters: Empire State Building Listeners respond to the story about the day in 1945 when a B-25 bomber hit the Empire State Building.
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Letters: Empire State Building

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Letters: Empire State Building

Letters: Empire State Building

Letters: Empire State Building

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Listeners respond to the story about the day in 1945 when a B-25 bomber hit the Empire State Building.

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

Now to your feedback on yesterday's program.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

Many of you thanked us for our story about the day in 1945 when a B-25 bomber hit the Empire State Building. And some of you were struck by how the story ended. It was a broadcast from that day on NBC.

DON GODDARD: Well, this is Don Goddard, and this is the National Broadcasting Company.

Unidentified Man: We return you now to the music of the First Piano Quartet.

BLOCK: Ed Seffring(ph) from David City, Nebraska, wrote this: While I really enjoyed the story with the great recordings and interviews, it points out a number of changes in our lifestyle since World War II. The large number of people working on Saturday morning, for example. But the most meaningful part for me was the NBC radio announcer at the end when he said: We've told you the story, we're going back to the music. Can you imagine that being said today?

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