Mary Chapin Carpenter: Country Gets Company : World Cafe Carpenter's music is often classified as country, for lack of a more accurate term. In reality, the multiple Grammy winner blends folk, rock and country, all intertwined with her own original melodies and lyrics. Her new disc, The Calling, touches on thorny political matters.
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Mary Chapin Carpenter in Studio on World Cafe - 04/03/2007

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Mary Chapin Carpenter: Country Gets Company

Mary Chapin Carpenter: Country Gets Company

Mary Chapin Carpenter in Studio on World Cafe - 04/03/2007

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9310666/9315750" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

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Set List

  • "Why Shouldn't We"
  • "Houston"
  • "The Calling"
  • "On with the Song"

Mary Chapin Carpenter's music is often classified as country, for lack of a more accurate term. In reality, the multiple Grammy winner blends folk, rock and country, all intertwined with her own original melodies and lyrics.

Carpenter signed a major-label deal while she was still on the open-mic circuit, and she quickly became a commercial success with hit albums like Come On Come On. But her music has become less conventionally country-driven over time, and she's continued to explore themes of independence and anti-materialism in her songwriting. Carpenter's new disc, The Calling, touches on thorny political subject matter — and reunites her with John Jennings, with whom she worked with at the beginning of her career.