Wal-Mart, Chinese Unions Reach Deal On Pay Raises Wal-Mart has struck agreements with unions in China that represent nearly 50,000 people who work for the U.S. retailer there. The deal with unions in various Chinese cities includes a pay raise of 8 percent over the next two years, to keep up with inflation.
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Wal-Mart, Chinese Unions Reach Deal On Pay Raises

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Wal-Mart, Chinese Unions Reach Deal On Pay Raises

Wal-Mart, Chinese Unions Reach Deal On Pay Raises

Wal-Mart, Chinese Unions Reach Deal On Pay Raises

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/93250768/93250733" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wal-Mart has struck agreements with unions in China that represent nearly 50,000 people who work for the U.S. retailer there. The deal with unions in various Chinese cities includes a pay raise of 8 percent over the next two years, to keep up with inflation.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today comes from Wal-Mart in China. It's a raise. Wal-Mart has struck agreements with unions in China. They represent nearly 50,000 people who work for the U.S. retailer there. China's unions are controlled by the government, however, so Wal-Mart's decided it was in its business interest to work with them rather than to try to keep them out. The agreement with unions in various Chinese cities includes a pay hike of 8 percent over the next two years to keep up with inflation.

And that's MORNING EDITION's business news from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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