Calif. Strawberries Bound For China's Top Athletes Some California farmers are getting an unexpected boost from China's Olympic athletes, who told Chinese officials that the fruit they most desire as they strive for gold is strawberries. Strawberry season in China has ended, so officials turned to California, where strawberry growers have been trying to break into China's market for years.
NPR logo

Calif. Strawberries Bound For China's Top Athletes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/93364762/93364733" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Calif. Strawberries Bound For China's Top Athletes

Calif. Strawberries Bound For China's Top Athletes

Calif. Strawberries Bound For China's Top Athletes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/93364762/93364733" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some California farmers are getting an unexpected boost from China's Olympic athletes, who told Chinese officials that the fruit they most desire as they strive for gold is strawberries. Strawberry season in China has ended, so officials turned to California, where strawberry growers have been trying to break into China's market for years.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business is about an unexpected boost some California farmers are getting thanks to China's Olympic athletes. The word is strawberries. Chinese officials asked their Olympic team what fruit they most desired as they strive for gold and the athletes said strawberries. But strawberry season in China has already ended, so officials turned to California, where strawberry growers have been trying to break into the China market for years.

Last weekend, crews in Watsonville combed through a one-acre patch looking for the most perfect berries. And yesterday the first shipment of American strawberry exports arrived in Beijing, destined for the stomachs of China's top athletes and possibly U.S. dignitaries, like President Bush.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.