Letters: Anthrax Case, 'Way Of The World,' Recipes Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep read from listeners' comments.
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Letters: Anthrax Case, 'Way Of The World,' Recipes

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Letters: Anthrax Case, 'Way Of The World,' Recipes

Letters: Anthrax Case, 'Way Of The World,' Recipes

Letters: Anthrax Case, 'Way Of The World,' Recipes

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/93364768/93364737" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep read from listeners' comments.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

It's Thursday morning, the day we often hear from your comments.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: You've got to be kidding me. That's how listener Brian Laughlin(ph) and many others reacted to an interview with Tom Ivins. He's the older brother of scientist Bruce Ivins who committed suicide amid an anthrax investigation. Tom Ivins told NPR he was not sorry his brother had died. The two had been estranged since 1985.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

I failed to see the point in your interview, writes listener Linda Smith of Grand Rapids, Michigan. What, pray tell, did you hope to learn that would shed any light at all on whether Dr. Ivins was or was not responsible for the anthrax attacks? It was at best sensationalism, and at worst just plain, ordinary gossip.

INSKEEP: A number of listeners responded to our conversation with journalist Ron Suskind. His new book, "The Way of the World," says the Bush administration knew or should have known Iraq had no weapons of mass destruction even before the war.

MONTAGNE: Russell Angiano(ph), listening here in California, called the interview, quote, "a little contrived." He writes: Suskind's allegations are nothing new, given all that we've learned about this administration and this war in the last five years.

INSKEEP: A couple of Suskind's sources have put out a response to another explosive charge. The writer says the White House ordered CIA Director George Tenet to fabricate evidence linking Iraq to 9/11. Here's how Ron Suskind told us about the creation of a bogus letter.

Mr. RON SUSKIND (Journalist, Author): There are off-the-record sources in the book. But there are on-the-record sources who are right in the thick of this operation, Rob Richer, the head of the Near East Division, just a notch or two below Tenet - Tenet turns to Richer, as he remembers it, he says: Listen, Marine - Richer's a former Marine - you're not going to like this, but here goes. Richer then takes it, he turns to John Maguire, who runs Iraq for the CIA, another senior manager. And Richer talks to McGuire, old intelligence hands, and they say, oh, goodness gracious. All right, well, an order's an order. And it goes down the chain.

INSKEEP: That's how Ron Suskind described the order to create that bogus letter earlier this week. After the publication of his book that quotes them by name, those two men just described are denying involvement. Rob Richer says he never received instruction from anyone in the chain of command to fabricate the letter, and he says John Maguire never did, either. The writer Ron Suskind says he spoke with both men many times while reporting his book, and he stands by his account.

MONTAGNE: And on another subject, many of you enjoyed the recipes I discussed with cook and author Nigella Lawson, who told us her secret to summer cooking is lemon zest and fresh vegetables.

Ms. NIGELLA LAWSON (Cook, Author): There's something rather gorgeous about using even the fruits of the countryside, vegetables of the countryside if you like. It makes one feel a sense that one's really enjoying the summer, I think.

INSKEEP: Listener Donald Norton of Bonita Springs, Florida wrote to say: I listened to Nigella Lawson describe a recipe of linguine with mushrooms and lemon zest on my way to work and thought even I could do that. I bought the groceries on the way home, and it was fantastic.

MONTAGNE: You can write us a letter. Just go to npr.org and click Contact Us.

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