Scientists Tap Tobacco Plants To Detect Landmines The red that normally colors the flower of a tobacco plant may now be put to use to signal "stop" in the presence of deadly land mines. South African scientists along with a Dutch biotech firm have engineered a tobacco plant with leaves that turn red when grown near land mines. Its roots detect the nitrogen dioxide leaching from the mines.

Scientists Tap Tobacco Plants To Detect Landmines

Scientists Tap Tobacco Plants To Detect Landmines

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The red that normally colors the flower of a tobacco plant may now be put to use to signal "stop" in the presence of deadly land mines. South African scientists along with a Dutch biotech firm have engineered a tobacco plant with leaves that turn red when grown near land mines. Its roots detect the nitrogen dioxide leaching from the mines.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

The red that normally colors the flower of a tobacco plant may now be put to use to signal stop in the presence of deadly land mines. South African scientists along with a Dutch biotech firm have engineered a tobacco plant with leaves that turn red when grown near land mines. Its roots detect the nitrogen dioxide leaching from the mines. The hope is the plant could safely locate fields of mines.

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