Storm Threatens To Disrupt Oil Supply Oil forecasters are watching the weather — and oil prices rose Monday in Asia — as Tropical Storm Fay headed toward the Florida Keys. The storm, which is expected to turn into a hurricane, could disrupt supply. Tourists were ordered out of the Keys on Sunday, and oil giant Royal Dutch Shell has evacuated about 360 staff members from the Gulf of Mexico.
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Storm Threatens To Disrupt Oil Supply

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Storm Threatens To Disrupt Oil Supply

Storm Threatens To Disrupt Oil Supply

Storm Threatens To Disrupt Oil Supply

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Oil forecasters are watching the weather — and oil prices rose Monday in Asia — as Tropical Storm Fay headed toward the Florida Keys. The storm, which is expected to turn into a hurricane, could disrupt supply. Tourists were ordered out of the Keys on Sunday, and oil giant Royal Dutch Shell has evacuated about 360 staff members from the Gulf of Mexico.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with oil forecasters watching the weather.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: The combination of oil and water has markets concerned as Tropical Storm Fay heads toward the Florida Keys. Oil prices rose today in Asia. Part of the reason is that this storm, which is expected to turn into a hurricane, could disrupt supply. We don't know how much, but we do know that Shell has already evacuated about 360 staff members from the Gulf of Mexico over the past couple of days.

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