Clinton Stumps For Obama: 'No McCain, No Palin' Democratic Sen. Hillary Clinton was back on the campaign trail Monday in Florida. But she is stumping for Barack Obama, hoping to shore up his support with women and Hispanic voters.
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Clinton Stumps For Obama: 'No McCain, No Palin'

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Clinton Stumps For Obama: 'No McCain, No Palin'

Clinton Stumps For Obama: 'No McCain, No Palin'

Clinton Stumps For Obama: 'No McCain, No Palin'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/94407518/94407469" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Democratic Sen. Hillary Clinton was back on the campaign trail Monday in Florida. But she is stumping for Barack Obama, hoping to shore up his support with women and Hispanic voters.

GREG ALLEN: I'm Greg Allen in Kissimmee, Florida. Hillary Clinton is no longer a presidential candidate, but in Florida she is still treated like one. She carried the state in the presidential primary, even though because of a party dispute the votes weren't counted until it was too late to make a difference. Florida is an important swing state, and the Obama campaign sent Senator Clinton here to reach out to two key groups, Hispanics and women. Many of the women who attended Senator Clinton's rally described themselves as fans or admirers. Some said they hadn't yet decided whether or not to vote for Obama. For those who are undecided, Senator Clinton had a message.

Senator HILLARY CLINTON (Democrat, New York): If we want to restore American leadership, if we want to restore the American standard of living, if we want to tackle the myriad of challenges facing our country, then to slightly amend my comments from Denver, no way, no how, no McCain, no Palin.

(Soundbite of crowd ovation)

ALLEN: That was about as close as she came anytime during her speech or afterward to launching direct criticism at Sarah Palin. Clinton said she thought her supporters would ultimately vote for Barack Obama whether there was a woman on the Republican ticket or not. And she refused to take issue with Palin's recent use of her line about the, quote, "18 million cracks in the glass ceiling" that Palin said the Republican ticket was now prepared to shatter.

Senator CLINTON: I think it's a historic fact. It's not my line. It is a great accomplishment. A lot of people are taking note of it. But I think that what's important here is to stay focused on the future. And this election is about the future.

ALLEN: Terry Stonebraker(ph) voted for Clinton in the primary, but since has thrown her support to Obama. She thinks it's just a matter of time before most of Clinton's other supporters do the same.

Ms. TERRY STONEBRAKER (Clinton Supporter): A middle-aged woman like me that is truly a Hillary supporter, in that last minute they are not going to color that dot for McCain and Palin, they're not.

ALLEN: That's something that Barack Obama and Joe Biden are counting on. Greg Allen, NPR News, Kissimmee, Florida.

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