Study Shows Body Clock Affects Arthritis Pain Arthritis sufferers often feel more pain in the morning than in the evening. A new study explains these fluctuations are driven by the body's internal clock.
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Study Shows Body Clock Affects Arthritis Pain

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Study Shows Body Clock Affects Arthritis Pain

Study Shows Body Clock Affects Arthritis Pain

Study Shows Body Clock Affects Arthritis Pain

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9515530/9515531" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Arthritis sufferers often feel more pain in the morning than in the evening. A new study explains these fluctuations are driven by the body's internal clock. Sydney Spiesel, a Yale Medical School professor and contributor to the online magazine Slate, talks with Alex Cohen.