Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Brings GE To Life Warren Buffett's company is investing three billion dollars in General Electric. The stock has fallen 42 percent in the past year. Buffett says he is confident that GE will continue to be successful. Berkshire Hathaway last week invested $5 billion in Goldman Sachs after the investment bank's shares dropped.

Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Brings GE To Life

Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Brings GE To Life

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Warren Buffett's company is investing three billion dollars in General Electric. The stock has fallen 42 percent in the past year. Buffett says he is confident that GE will continue to be successful. Berkshire Hathaway last week invested $5 billion in Goldman Sachs after the investment bank's shares dropped.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

NPR's business news starts with Warren Buffett's buying spree.

(Soundbite of music)

SHAPIRO: The old adage says buy low, sell high. Well, financial turmoil has driven many companies' stocks so low that if you've got a bit of confidence and a lot of cash, like Warren Buffett, it's not a bad time to buy. And that's exactly what he's doing. Yesterday, the legendary investor agreed to buy at least $3 billion of stock in General Electric. GE stock has fallen almost 50 percent since last year. Investors have been worried about the impact of the credit crisis on GE stock. Almost half the company's profits come from its finance business. Buffett's move comes about a week after his company Berkshire Hathaway agreed to sink $5 billion into the investment bank Goldman Sachs. Goldman stock is also down nearly 50 percent from its peak last year.

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