Windshield Wipers Invented In 'Flash Of Genius' In 1967, Robert Kearns received patents for inventing intermittent car windshield wipers. He offered his idea to automakers but was turned away. When Ford and Chrysler started manufacturing cars with wipers without crediting Kearns, he took the case all the way to the Supreme Court. A new film called Flash of Genius tells his story.
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Windshield Wipers Invented In 'Flash Of Genius'

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Windshield Wipers Invented In 'Flash Of Genius'

Windshield Wipers Invented In 'Flash Of Genius'

Windshield Wipers Invented In 'Flash Of Genius'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/95344135/95344129" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A drawing from the intermittent windshield wiper patent, created by Robert Kearns. USPTO hide caption

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USPTO

A drawing from the intermittent windshield wiper patent, created by Robert Kearns.

USPTO

In 1967, Robert Kearns received patents for inventing intermittent car windshield wipers. He offered his idea to automakers but was turned away. When Ford and Chrysler started manufacturing cars with wipers without crediting Kearns, he took the case all the way to the Supreme Court. A new film called Flash of Genius tells his story.

Guests:

John Seabrook, staff writer at The New York Times, author of Flash of Genius and Other True Stories of Invention

Mark Abraham, producer and director of film Flash of Genius

Greg Kinnear, plays lead role of Bob Kearns in Flash of Genius

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