Panel Discusses Presidential Debate in Nashville Some watching the presidential debate Tuesday night said they found the town hall-style format at times restrictive despite intentions for it to give voters a chance to set the agenda for the discussion. They also said that the candidates' answers were light on specifics.
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Panel Discusses Presidential Debate in Nashville

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Panel Discusses Presidential Debate in Nashville

Panel Discusses Presidential Debate in Nashville

Panel Discusses Presidential Debate in Nashville

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Some watching the presidential debate Tuesday night at Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn. said they found the town hall-style format at times restrictive despite intentions to give voters a chance to set the agenda for the discussion.

They also said that the candidates' answers were light on specifics.

Panelists sharing opinions about the debate were: Maria Teresa Peterson, executive director of Voto Latino, a voter education and outreach group; Melanie Bengtson, editor of Belmont University's student newspaper The Belmont Vision; Dwight Lewis, editorial page editor for The (Nashville) Tennessean; and NPR Political Editor Ken Rudin.