Honoring First Immigrant Processed At Ellis Island It was just two years ago that Annie Moore's descendants discovered she provided a face for America's immigrant story. Moore was the first immigrant to be processed at Ellis Island, in 1892. On Saturday, she'll finally get a marker on her grave. The Irish immigrant made a new life in America but died poor. Brian Andersson, New York's commissioner of records, says the new headstone will honor a person with a very specific "spot in history."
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Honoring First Immigrant Processed At Ellis Island

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Honoring First Immigrant Processed At Ellis Island

Honoring First Immigrant Processed At Ellis Island

Honoring First Immigrant Processed At Ellis Island

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It was just two years ago that Annie Moore's descendants discovered she provided a face for America's immigrant story. Moore was the first immigrant to be processed at Ellis Island, in 1892. On Saturday, she'll finally get a marker on her grave. The Irish immigrant made a new life in America but died poor. Brian Andersson, New York's commissioner of records, says the new headstone will honor a person with a very specific "spot in history."

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. It was just two years ago that Annie Moore's descendants discovered she provided a face of America's immigrant story as the first immigrant to be processed at Ellis Island, in 1892. Tomorrow, she'll finally get a marker on her grave. The Irish immigrant made a new life in America but died poor. Brian Andersson, New York's Commissioner of Records, says the new headstone will honor a person with a very specific spot in history. It's Morning Edition.

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