South Korea South Korean newspapers today are headlining reports that outgoing President Kim Dae Jung authorized $200 million to go to North Korea just before a summit between the two nations in 2000. Critics say the payoff negated the summit, which was billed as a breakthrough in North-South relations. Some are even saying it could spell the end of Kim's so-called sunshine policy of engagement with the North. NPR's Rob Gifford reports from Seoul.
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South Korea

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South Korea

South Korea

South Korea

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South Korean newspapers today are headlining reports that outgoing President Kim Dae Jung authorized $200 million to go to North Korea just before a summit between the two nations in 2000. Critics say the payoff negated the summit, which was billed as a breakthrough in North-South relations. Some are even saying it could spell the end of Kim's so-called sunshine policy of engagement with the North. NPR's Rob Gifford reports from Seoul.