Obama Challenges Bush Policies Backed By McCain Barack Obama said Thursday in New Hampshire that he's not trying to run against President Bush but against the Bush policies that John McCain supports. Obama also charged that McCain hasn't outlined anything he would do differently from President Bush on important economic issues.
NPR logo

Obama Challenges Bush Policies Backed By McCain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/95816713/95816682" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Obama Challenges Bush Policies Backed By McCain

Obama Challenges Bush Policies Backed By McCain

Obama Challenges Bush Policies Backed By McCain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/95816713/95816682" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Barack Obama said Thursday in New Hampshire that he's not trying to run against President Bush but against the Bush policies that John McCain supports. Obama also charged that McCain hasn't outlined anything he would do differently from President Bush on important economic issues.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's Morning Edition from NPR News. Good morning, I am Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And I am Renee Montagne. For the second night in a row, Barack Obama and John McCain shared a stage, not to debate but to tell jokes. It was the annual Al Smith Dinner in New York. That's a charity event named for the first Catholic ever nominated to run for president. A Democrat, who lost to Herbert Hoover in 1928. It's become a tradition for presidential nominees of both parties to attend this event and make light of themselves.

BARACK OBAMA: I was thrilled to get this invitation and I feel right at home here because it's often been said that I share the politics of Alfred E. Smith and the ears of Alfred E. Newman.

JOHN MCCAIN: Yes. It's true that this morning, I've dismissed my entire team of senior advisers. All of their positions will now be held by man named Joe the Plumber.

MONTAGNE: There was levity yesterday and there was also politics as usual. We have two reports beginning with Don Gonyea on Barack Obama.

DON GONYEA: Before the evening's activities in New York, Senator Obama headed to New Hampshire, a state that went Democratic last time and Republican the time before that. This year, Obama leads in statewide polls prompting this at a rally at an apple and pumpkin farm in Londonderry.

OBAMA: Nineteen days away, but for those who are getting a little cocky, I've got two words for you, New Hampshire.

GONYEA: He was talking about the January New Hampshire primary. Back then, polls gave him a growing lead over Senator Clinton, but he lost.

OBAMA: I learned right here with the help of my great friend and supporter, Hillary Clinton, that you cannot let up. You can't pay too much attention to polls. We got to keep making our case for change. We've got to keep fighting for every single vote. We got to keep running through the finish line. This election is too important to take anything for granted.

GONYEA: So Obama himself kept up the attacks on his opponent yesterday.

OBAMA: Last night, Senator McCain said that George Bush won't be on the ballot this November. He said, yeah you, I don't know why you're running against George Bush. I am not running against George Bush. I am running against all those policies of George Bush that you support, Senator McCain.

GONYEA: Barack Obama in Londonderry, New Hampshire. Don Gonyea, NPR News.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.