Letters: 'Joe the Plumber' Many letters from listeners have been about a certain plumber named Joe. That's 'Joe the Plumber,' of course, and many listeners didn't think the coverage yesterday was appropriate, or funny.
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Letters: 'Joe the Plumber'

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Letters: 'Joe the Plumber'

Letters: 'Joe the Plumber'

Letters: 'Joe the Plumber'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/95843550/95843969" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many letters from listeners have been about a certain plumber named Joe. That's 'Joe the Plumber,' of course, and many listeners didn't think the coverage yesterday was appropriate, or funny.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Now, your comments about our program, many of them focused on a certain plumber named Joe.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

That's Joe Wurzelbacher of course, an Ohio man who's become famous since Wednesday's presidential debate. We've learned a lot about him since then, including as our coverage yesterday pointed out, that he owes about $1,200 in back taxes.

NORRIS: Well, Andy Melton of Midlothian, Virginia was one of many listeners who didn't think our scrutiny was appropriate.

BLOCK: He writes, let me make sure I understand. If I'm given the rare opportunity to stand face to face with a presidential candidate, I need to have all my financial affairs in order and be briefed on the tax code before posing a difficult question lest I suffer the wrath of worldwide media scrutiny.

NORRIS: Our coverage also included a piece of satire, a trailer for an imagined TV show.

(Soundbite of television show)

Unidentified Man #1: He's a small businessman who's not afraid to get his hands dirty.

Unidentified Man #2: Credit lines clogged? Ben Bernanke's per day, I'm on it.

Unidentified Man #1: Joe the Plumber. It's the blockage, stupid.

NORRIS: Well, some of you did not find the humor in that, including David Murmur of Branchville, New Jersey.

BLOCK: This mocking radio parody was completely absent of any comedy, he writes. In fact if comedy were even near that skit, it would've shriveled and died.

NORRIS: Ouch! We got another harsh review from Tim Dickson of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He writes, I really want to like the bits of satire that ATC plays, but this is just really, really not funny. If you take all the funniness in the world and get rid of it, that's how much is there.

BLOCK: They love us, Michele. They've really, really love us.

NORRIS: Well, just not yesterday.

BLOCK: You can send us your comments by going to npr.org, click on Contact Us at the top of the page.

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