Letters: 'Dirty Wow Wow' Stuffs the Mail Box We received numerous responses to our request for letters about people's own "dirty wow wows" — those plush snuggly pets and blankets that are so important to children. We ask a few of our listeners to read their stories.
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Letters: 'Dirty Wow Wow' Stuffs the Mail Box

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Letters: 'Dirty Wow Wow' Stuffs the Mail Box

Letters: 'Dirty Wow Wow' Stuffs the Mail Box

Letters: 'Dirty Wow Wow' Stuffs the Mail Box

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9591770/9591772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

We received numerous responses to our request for letters about people's own "dirty wow wows" — those plush snuggly pets and blankets that are so important to children. We ask a few of our listeners to read their stories.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Two weeks ago, after our interview about the book "Dirty Wow Wow," a collection of favorite childhood companions, we asked you to write to us about yours. Candy Panda, Buffel Beans(ph) and Blue Teddy are just some of the fuzzy friends mentioned in your letters. Unfortunately, we can't include everyone, but we did contact a few of our listeners and asked them to read their stories.

Ms. BONNIE PAISLEY-SCOTT(ph) (Listener, Portland, Oregon): My name is Bonnie Paisley-Scott(ph), and I'm from Portland, Oregon. My aunt lives in Alaska, and she gave me a stuffed sea otter when I was about two years old. It quickly became my most prized possession and I took it everywhere with me. It has felt ears, whiskers and a plastic shell on its chest.

One day, when I was about seven years old, while I was contemplating my undying love for my otter, I decided to cut off its felt ears and whiskers and save them in a plastic bag. My reasoning at the time was that if my otter was ever destroyed in a house fire, I would at least have its ears and whiskers. And even though I still have my otter, it has been replaced in my bed by my husband who also has nice whiskers, which I won't be cutting off.

Ms. CHRISSIE DUNN(ph) (Listener, Lake Orion, Michigan): This is Chrissie Dunn(ph) from Lake Orion(ph), Michigan. When my son Matthew was born, he inherited my favorite doll blanket. He rejected all of the new blankets and clung to that old blanket, which he called his Beverish(ph). This Sunday marked the third week that our son, PSC Matthew Dunn, has spent in Iraq. He's not been sleeping well, so in a recent conversation, we asked if he was sleeping any better. And much to our surprise, he answered that he was. He had forgotten that he tucked his Beverish into his backpack. He said that once he discovered it, he put it on his pillow, smelled home, instantly fell asleep and slept through the night.

Ms. KAREN MULLETT(ph) (Listener, Denver, Colorado): My name is Karen Mullett(ph) and I'm from Denver, Colorado. Fuzzy(ph) joined the family when my son Tommy was diagnosed with medulloblastoma(ph) at age five. A floppy dog, he was a gift to Tommy from his kindergarten speech therapy teacher. Fuzzy's duties included companionship during every hospital or clinic visit as well as the nighttime snuggle-into-bed-and-keep-Tommy-warm routine. Sometimes, I made the 30-mile journey to home to retrieve Fuzzy if Tommy was unexpectedly admitted to the hospital. When Tommy passed away in 1997, Fuzzy became my dog. Now, he keeps me warm at night. And in those moments when my fog of grief is the greatest, I know that Fuzzy remembers Tommy with as much yearning as I do.

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HANSEN: Thanks to all of you who sent in your favorites. You can write to us. Just go our Web site at NPR.org and click on the Contact Us link.

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HANSEN: This is NPR News.

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