Today's Americans Duck Knowledge, Study Says A new Pew Research Center for the People and the Press survey shows that most Americans are no more knowledgeable about current affairs today than they were years ago — despite the explosion of information technologies that give the public access to news around the clock.
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Today's Americans Duck Knowledge, Study Says

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Today's Americans Duck Knowledge, Study Says

Today's Americans Duck Knowledge, Study Says

Today's Americans Duck Knowledge, Study Says

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A new Pew Research Center for the People and the Press survey shows that most Americans are no more knowledgeable about current affairs today than they were years ago — despite the explosion of information technologies that give the public access to news around the clock.

On the whole, Pew Director Andrew Kohut says, a large percentage of people remain uninformed about about public affairs and choose not to vote. Robert Siegel talks with Andrew Kohut, who says that there is also a small percentage of very well-informed citizenry.