Black Horror Movies And Their Greater Social Impact From Blacula to Candy Man, black people and horror movies go way back. For more on the films' social impact, Farai Chideya speaks with professor Stephane Dunn and actor Tony Todd, who played the legendary horror icon, Candyman.
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Black Horror Movies And Their Greater Social Impact

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Black Horror Movies And Their Greater Social Impact

Black Horror Movies And Their Greater Social Impact

Black Horror Movies And Their Greater Social Impact

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From Blacula and Night of the Living Dead to Candy Man and Bones, black people and horror movies have a storied history.

The films are not only entertaining; many also break down social conventions.

For more on the world of black horror movies, Farai Chideya speaks with Stephane Dunn — an assistant professor of English at Morehouse College — and actor Tony Todd, who has played the legendary horror icon, the Candyman.