Obama, Japan, Suggests A Presidential Visit If Barack Obama wins the White House, he already has an invitation for a foreign tour. Residents of Obama, Japan, have been wearing "I Love Obama" T-shirts. As far as we know, there's no McCain, Japan. But it's a fair guess that the Republican is getting votes from customers of McCain Mall in North Little Rock in Arkansas — a state that McCain is favored to win.
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Obama, Japan, Suggests A Presidential Visit

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Obama, Japan, Suggests A Presidential Visit

Obama, Japan, Suggests A Presidential Visit

Obama, Japan, Suggests A Presidential Visit

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/96557584/96557661" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

If Barack Obama wins the White House, he already has an invitation for a foreign tour. Residents of Obama, Japan, have been wearing "I Love Obama" T-shirts. As far as we know, there's no McCain, Japan. But it's a fair guess that the Republican is getting votes from customers of McCain Mall in North Little Rock in Arkansas — a state that McCain is favored to win.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. If Barack Obama wins the White House, he already has an invitation for a foreign tour. Residents of a town in Japan have been wearing "I Love Obama" T-shirts. It is not known if the Democrat would actually visit the town of Obama, Japan. As far as we know, there's no McCain, Japan. But it's a fair guess that the Republican is getting votes from customers of the McCain Mall. It's in North Little Rock, Arkansas, a state that McCain is favored to win. You're listening to Morning Edition.

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