Serious Juju: Looking Back at King Sunny Ade For many veteran AfroPop performers, the end of the LP era meant their back catalogs were suddenly unavailable. And for many of those musicians, there's no prospect of a CD being produced locally. So it's good news, according to music critic Milo Miles, that the music of one performer who made a splash in the West — Nigerian juju superstar King Sunny Ade — is being smartly preserved in the digital age. Miles reviews three new collections: Gems From the Classic Years and The Best of the Classic Years, both on the Shanachie label, and King of Juju, from Wrasse.
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Serious Juju: Looking Back at King Sunny Ade

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Serious Juju: Looking Back at King Sunny Ade

Review

Serious Juju: Looking Back at King Sunny Ade

Serious Juju: Looking Back at King Sunny Ade

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9685123/9685132" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

For many veteran AfroPop performers, the end of the LP era meant their back catalogs were suddenly unavailable. And for many of those musicians, there's no prospect of a CD being produced locally. So it's good news, according to music critic Milo Miles, that the music of one performer who made a splash in the West — Nigerian juju superstar King Sunny Ade — is being smartly preserved in the digital age. Miles reviews three new collections: Gems From the Classic Years and The Best of the Classic Years, both on the Shanachie label, and King of Juju, from Wrasse.