To Revamp U.S. Democracy, Look to France A Republican who just returned from France got a good look at the French election process. He thinks the United States could learn a few things from our French friends.
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To Revamp U.S. Democracy, Look to France

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To Revamp U.S. Democracy, Look to France

To Revamp U.S. Democracy, Look to France

To Revamp U.S. Democracy, Look to France

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9692280/9692281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Republican who just returned from France got a good look at the French election process. He thinks the United States could learn a few things from our French friends.

MIKE MURPHY: I'm a right-wing Republican with a terrible secret.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

This is commentator and media consultant Mike Murphy.

MURPHY: I like the way the French government monitors TV and radio newscasts with a stopwatch to make sure all the 12 candidates, including Frederique and his faithful companion, get exactly the same amount of coverage. Talk about fair and balanced.

TV: After seeing the system in action myself, I think I'll keep defending France, reminding my conservative pals that the French system works hard to give every candidate a fair and equal shot while giving French voters a democracy with real choices. That strikes me as American as the Statue of Liberty.

NORRIS: Mike Murphy is a writer and Republican media consultant.

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