Nebraska Legislators Evaluate Safe-Haven Law State legislators in Nebraska are meeting in a special session to evaluate the state's safe-haven law. It was meant to protect infants. But more than half of the 33 children legally abandoned under the law since it took effect in mid-July have been teenagers. Todd Landry, director of Children and Family Services in the state, says the law has had unintended consequences.
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Nebraska Legislators Evaluate Safe-Haven Law

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Nebraska Legislators Evaluate Safe-Haven Law

Nebraska Legislators Evaluate Safe-Haven Law

Nebraska Legislators Evaluate Safe-Haven Law

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State legislators in Nebraska are meeting in a special session Friday to evaluate the state's safe-haven law. The measure was meant to protect infants. However, more than half of the 33 children legally abandoned under the law since it took effect in mid-July have been teenagers. Todd Landry, the director of Nebraska's Children and Family Services division, talks with Ari Shapiro about the law having unintended consequences.