Shooter Used Americanized Version of His Name Since the Virginia Tech shooter was identified, media organizations have disagreed about how to present his name. NPR uses Seung-hui Cho, an Americanized version that the 23-year-old from Centreville, Va., used often — though not always.
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Shooter Used Americanized Version of His Name

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Shooter Used Americanized Version of His Name

Shooter Used Americanized Version of His Name

Shooter Used Americanized Version of His Name

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Since the Virginia Tech shooter was identified, media organizations have disagreed about how to present his name. NPR uses Seung-hui Cho, an Americanized version that the 23-year-old from Centreville, Va., used often — though not always.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Unidentified Man#3: The words and images left behind by Cho Seung-hui...

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS BROADCASTS)

MONTAGNE: That's how Fox News, NBC, MSNBC and CNN identified the 23-year-old gunman. But in the Los Angeles Times, on ABC and NPR, you heard this.

ROBERT SIEGEL: The shooter has been identified as Seung-hui Cho...

ALEX CHADWICK: Unidentified Man#4: Reporters say Seung-hui Cho was taken to a mental health facility.

MONTAGNE: Many listeners have asked for an explanation. And some have pointed out that in the country Cho emigrated from, South Korea, the family name appears first followed by the given name. In this case the family name is Cho, the given name Seung-hui. NPR is using the Americanized version of the shooters name, Seung-hui Cho. Cho himself seems to have used both versions.

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