No Charges for Police Who Used Scalpers' Seats During the 2006 World Series, eight St. Louis police officers allegedly gave away tickets to friends that were confiscated in a scalping arrest. Robert Siegel talks with St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce, who has decided not to bring charges against the officers.
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No Charges for Police Who Used Scalpers' Seats

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No Charges for Police Who Used Scalpers' Seats

No Charges for Police Who Used Scalpers' Seats

No Charges for Police Who Used Scalpers' Seats

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9724376/9724377" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

During the 2006 World Series, eight St. Louis police officers allegedly gave away tickets they confiscated during a scalping arrest.

After the game, the tickets, which were used to gain admission but were not ripped or torn (World Series tickets don't get ripped by ticket-takers), were placed back into evidence.

The prosecutor's office has decided not to bring charges against the officers.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce tells Robert Siegel that since the evidence, in this case the tickets, wasn't tampered with, the officers are in the clear under Missouri law.