Chinese City Cracks Down On Pirated Software Red Flag Linux is the name of a Chinese-made operating system. Officials in Nanchang are forcing local Internet cafe owners to install it in place of Microsoft Windows. An official from the the city's Cultural Discipline Team confirmed this to Radio Free Asia, which is funded by the U.S. government. The rule is apparently aimed at cracking down on pirated software. But some cafe owners say they're using Microsoft legally and don't want to change. They're also not happy about the fees for Red Flag Linux, which are more than $700.

Chinese City Cracks Down On Pirated Software

Chinese City Cracks Down On Pirated Software

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Red Flag Linux is the name of a Chinese-made operating system. Officials in Nanchang are forcing local Internet cafe owners to install it in place of Microsoft Windows. An official from the the city's Cultural Discipline Team confirmed this to Radio Free Asia, which is funded by the U.S. government. The rule is apparently aimed at cracking down on pirated software. But some cafe owners say they're using Microsoft legally and don't want to change. They're also not happy about the fees for Red Flag Linux, which are more than $700.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today comes from China. The word is raise the Red Flag. Red Flag Linux is the name of a Chinese-made operating system. Officials in the city of Nanchang are forcing local Internet cafe owners to install it in place of Microsoft Windows XP. An official from the city's cultural discipline team confirmed this to Radio Free Asia, which is funded by the U.S. government.

The rule is apparently aimed at cracking down on pirated software, but some cafe owners say they're using Microsoft legally, and they don't want to change. They're also not happy about the installation fees for Red Flag Linux, more than $700. And that's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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