Gene Discoverer Invited To Nobel Ceremony Scientist Douglas Prasher isolated a glowing jellyfish protein gene. When he lost his research funding, three other scientists built on that work. In October, it was announced that two U.S. and one Japanese scientists had won the Nobel Prize in chemistry. Prasher no longer works as a scientist. He now drives a courtesy van. The U.S. scientists who won the prize this week invited Prasher and his wife to Stockholm for the Nobel ceremony. They will thank him in their acceptance speeches and will pay for the trip.
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Gene Discoverer Invited To Nobel Ceremony

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Gene Discoverer Invited To Nobel Ceremony

Gene Discoverer Invited To Nobel Ceremony

Gene Discoverer Invited To Nobel Ceremony

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/97843626/97843608" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Scientist Douglas Prasher isolated a glowing jellyfish protein gene. When he lost his research funding, three other scientists built on that work. In October, it was announced that two U.S. and one Japanese scientists had won the Nobel Prize in chemistry. Prasher no longer works as a scientist. He now drives a courtesy van. The U.S. scientists who won the prize this week invited Prasher and his wife to Stockholm for the Nobel ceremony. They will thank him in their acceptance speeches and will pay for the trip.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Last month we told you about this scientist.

Mr. DOUGLAS PRASHER (Scientist): I kind of - I've got a hard-luck story.

MONTAGNE: Now we have an update on Douglas Prasher. Prasher's the man who isolated a protein gene for a glowing jellyfish. When he lost his research funding, three other scientists built on that work, two Americans and one Japanese, and they shared this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry. Meanwhile, Prasher took a job driving a courtesy van.

Mr. PRASHER: I never thought I would enjoy working with people this much because doing science you know, it's kind of a loner thing. But doing this, you know, I meet new people every day, and I hear all kinds of stories - some of which I don't need to hear.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MONTAGNE: This week Douglas Prasher heard something he loved hearing. The American Nobel winners invited him and his wife to the award ceremony in Stockholm. They will thank him in their acceptance speeches, and they'll pay for the trip.

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