Newspaper Steals Empire State Building It took just 90 minutes for journalists at the New York Daily News to "steal" the Empire State Building. As part of an investigation into a loophole that doesn't require clerks to verify information, the journalists transferred the building's ownership deed with a forged notary stamp. The buyer? Nelots Properties. Nelots reads "stolen" backwards. Fay Wray — star of the original King Kong movie — was listed as a witness. The paper fessed up and returned the landmark building the next day.
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Newspaper Steals Empire State Building

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Newspaper Steals Empire State Building

Newspaper Steals Empire State Building

Newspaper Steals Empire State Building

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It took just 90 minutes for journalists at the New York Daily News to "steal" the Empire State Building. As part of an investigation into a loophole that doesn't require clerks to verify information, the journalists transferred the building's ownership deed with a forged notary stamp. The buyer? Nelots Properties. Nelots reads "stolen" backwards. Fay Wray — star of the original King Kong movie — was listed as a witness. The paper fessed up and returned the landmark building the next day.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. It took just 90 minutes for the New York Daily News to steal the Empire State Building. As part of an investigation into how easy it is to swipe a building. Journalists transferred the ownership deed for this legendary address with a forged notary stamp. One of the witnesses, Fay Wray of "King Kong" fame. The buyer, Nelots Properties - that's stolen spelled backwards. The Daily News 'fessed up and returned the Empire State Building the next day. It's Morning Edition.

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