In Rough Times, More People Abandon Their Pets Animal shelters are seeing an upswing in abandoned dogs and cats as people reconsider the importance of their pets. We examine one program in Chicago that is offering two-for-one adoption specials, organizing pet food banks and accepting dogs from families in foreclosure.
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In Rough Times, More People Abandon Their Pets

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In Rough Times, More People Abandon Their Pets

In Rough Times, More People Abandon Their Pets

In Rough Times, More People Abandon Their Pets

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/98013298/98013266" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The economic downturn means people are reconsidering the importance of their pets. Consequently, animal shelters are seeing an upswing in abandoned dogs and cats. We examine one program in Chicago that is offering two-for-one adoption specials, organizing pet food banks and accepting dogs from families in foreclosure.

Adriene Hill reports for Chicago Public Radio.