Ninth Inning: Surviving With A Purpose Eighty-four-year-old Eldora Wood runs her own gift shop, goes to work every day and raised eight children. Her son introduces her as the "Queen Mother of Pinehurst."
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Ninth Inning: Surviving With A Purpose

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Ninth Inning: Surviving With A Purpose

Ninth Inning: Surviving With A Purpose

Ninth Inning: Surviving With A Purpose

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We've received a lot of e-mails about our series "the Ninth Inning." Over the past few weeks, we've heard the stories of extraordinary Americans over 80, including an 85-year-old garlic farmer and author, and a 91-year old dancer. Today, we are talking to 84-year-old Eldora Wood, who came to our attention through one of those e-mails. Her son wrote in to tell us why we should feature his mother.

"My mother runs her own gift shop," he told us. "She goes to work every day and travels around the country to stock the store. She was a child of the Midwest and Depression, taught school in a one-roomed school house in rural Iowa, has survived the slow death of her husband from Alzheimers, and breast cancer. My mother also raised four children of her own and four from her husband's first marriage. She is affectionately known by her children as the Queen Mother of Pinehurst."