No Sale When a real estate agent took a married couple to see a house in Janesville, Wisc., the wife screamed. At first, the agent assumed she'd seen a mouse. No such luck. The homeowner was dead. Authorities don't suspect foul play. But the episode underlines a real estate maxim: when you're showing a house, the current owner shouldn't be around.
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No Sale

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No Sale

No Sale

No Sale

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When a real estate agent took a married couple to see a house in Janesville, Wisc., the wife screamed. At first, the agent assumed she'd seen a mouse. No such luck. The homeowner was dead. Authorities don't suspect foul play. But the episode underlines a real estate maxim: when you're showing a house, the current owner shouldn't be around.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

If you want to maximize the sale price of your house, do not do this. A real estate agent took a married couple to see a house in Janesville, Wisconsin. The wife screamed, and at first the agent assumed she'd seen a dead mouse. No such luck. What they'd found was a dead homeowner lying on the bed. Authorities do not suspect foul play in this case, but it does bring to mind the maxim that when you're showing a house, the current owner should not be around.

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