Congressional Leaders Visit White House for Talks The House of Representatives failed to override President Bush's veto of the war funding bill that included timetables for beginning a U.S. troop withdrawal. Within an hour, President Bush sat down with leaders of both parties in Congress. All parties said they wanted to compromise, but none offered to give any ground.
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Congressional Leaders Visit White House for Talks

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Congressional Leaders Visit White House for Talks

Congressional Leaders Visit White House for Talks

Congressional Leaders Visit White House for Talks

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9966105/9966106" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The House of Representatives failed to override President Bush's veto of the war funding bill that included timetables for beginning a U.S. troop withdrawal. Within an hour, President Bush sat down with leaders of both parties in Congress. All parties said they wanted to compromise, but none offered to give any ground.

BRIAN NAYLOR: Wisconsin Democrat David Obey who chairs the House Appropriations Committee says the ball is in the president's court.

DAVID OBEY: We can't compromise with ourselves. I want to know what he's going to agree to give up. It's his turn to lay something on the table.

NAYLOR: While Democrats lost this battle over a timetable for leaving Iraq, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said any Iraq spending bill for the remainder of this fiscal year must still contain a number of other requirements.

HARRY REID: It takes care of the troops, that has language in it, that has the Iraqis take care of their own country and transitions the mission that is now ongoing and finally shows a reasonable way to end this war. That's our message to the president.

NAYLOR: Brian Naylor, NPR News, the Capitol.

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