Killer Whales: The Allure Of The Search Studying animals in nature isn't always about close encounters. For the field biologist, there is passion in the search for the quarry and the lengths to which people will go to find it.
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Killer Whales: The Allure Of The Search

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Killer Whales: The Allure Of The Search

Killer Whales: The Allure Of The Search

Killer Whales: The Allure Of The Search

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/99834201/99851306" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Produced by Ari Daniel Shapiro/YouTube.com

The Sounds Of Norwegian Killer Whales

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A field team consisting of (from left) Volker Deecke, Harriet Bolt, Hannah Wood and Andy Foote visited Scotland's Shetland Islands last summer to study the eating habits and vocal activity of killer whales. Courtesy of Volker Deecke hide caption

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Courtesy of Volker Deecke

A field team consisting of (from left) Volker Deecke, Harriet Bolt, Hannah Wood and Andy Foote visited Scotland's Shetland Islands last summer to study the eating habits and vocal activity of killer whales.

Courtesy of Volker Deecke

The research team spent days and days scanning the waters off the Shetland Islands, about 80 miles north of Scotland, for signs of killer whales. Courtesy of Volker Deecke hide caption

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Courtesy of Volker Deecke

The research team spent days and days scanning the waters off the Shetland Islands, about 80 miles north of Scotland, for signs of killer whales.

Courtesy of Volker Deecke

Field assistants scan the water for whales. To get close enough, they first had to find them by spotting the animals from a distance. Courtesy of Volcker Deecke hide caption

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Courtesy of Volcker Deecke

Field assistants scan the water for whales. To get close enough, they first had to find them by spotting the animals from a distance.

Courtesy of Volcker Deecke

Killer whale biologist turned radio producer Ari Daniel Shapiro says the animals may capture people's imaginations because of their elusiveness. Courtesy of Ari Daniel Shapiro hide caption

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Courtesy of Ari Daniel Shapiro