Turkish PM, Israeli President Clash At Davos Turkey's prime minister walked off the stage at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, after verbally sparring with Israeli President Shimon Peres over Gaza.
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Turkish PM, Israeli President Clash At Davos

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Turkish PM, Israeli President Clash At Davos

Turkish PM, Israeli President Clash At Davos

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MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

To Davos, Switzerland, now and the annual of the meeting of the World Economic Forum. The gathering of political and economic leaders is known for its friendly atmosphere, gracious dialogue, and consensus-building spirit, but today included something very different at a session on the recent fighting in Gaza.

SHIMON PERES: President Mubarak accused Hamas, not us, and President Mubarak knows the situation, not less than you, Mr. Prime Minister.

SIEGEL: That's Israeli President Shimon Peres addressing Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The two were on stage together, and Erdogan condemned the killings of some 1,300 Palestinians and tried to get in a few last points before he was cut short by moderator David Ignatius.

DAVID IGNATIUS: Mr. Prime Minister, we can't start the debate again. Please, we just don't have time.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN: Excuse me...

NORRIS: Erdogan stomped off the stage with these remarks spoken through an interpreter.

TAYYIP ERDOGAN: (Through Translator) Thank you very much. Thank you very much. So, I don't think I will come back to Davos after this.

SIEGEL: Later, at a news conference, President Peres said he regretted how the session ended and he commended Prime Minister Erdogan for his diplomatic efforts in the Middle East.

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